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Posts tagged ‘anxiety’

Palo Santo (Holy Wood) Essential Oil

Latin Name: Bursera graveolens

 

Family:  Burseaceae

 

Extraction Method: Steam distilled using wood

 

Aroma:  Warm and resinous

Bursera graveolens which is known in Spanish as palo santo is a tree that grows on the coast of South America.  The meaning of palo santo in Spanish is Holy wood.  This tree belongs to the burseraceae family.  This family also includes frankincense and myrrh which might explain why they blend so well together.  These three essential oils have very different chemical properties but their synergies are a perfect match. 

 

Palo santo is derived from the wood but it is usually sustainably harvested.  Those that harvest the wood only collect the trunks and branches that have fallen naturally from the tree.  This allows the tree to continue to grow undisturbed while it grants us its fallen gifts which provide an amazing host of supportive energetic properties.

 

Holy Wood is such an appropriate interpretation because this oil is so emotionally cleansing.  It supports healing by quieting mental activity and may bring the user of the oil a sense of peace.  Palo Santo also grants a person inner unity and soothes overthinking.  Palo Santo has been traditionally used to address panic attacks and anxiety because it aids in calming the mind therefore provides protection.  The wood of Palo Santo has been burned in many ceremonies due to its spiritual purifying properties.  The shavings of the wood can be burned similar to incense.   It is used to clear “bad energy”. 

 

The particular batch of palo santo that I currently have contains a high amount of d-limonene.   Some of the therapeutic properties of d-limonene are analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, immunostimulant and antioxidant.  This oil would be beneficial in a blend to support colds and join pain  from tight muscles.  It also would be an effective choice as part of a skin care blend because of its antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory components.

 

Resources

Componenet Database @ Aromahead http://components.aromahead.com/

Wikipedia, The Free encyclopedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bursera_graveolens

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease.

Ylang Ylang Essential Oil

Latin Name: Cananga odorata 

 

Family:  Annonaceae

 

Extraction Method: Steam distilled using the flowers

 

Aroma: Floral, Sweet and Sensual

Ylang Ylang is a tropical tree that is native to Madagascar, Java, Sumatra and the Philippines.  The best essential oil is derived from the yellowed-flowered trees.  Timing is everything with Ylang Ylang and in order to obtain a good essential oil, this tree must be harvested early summer during the morning hour for distillation.  There are as many as five different grades of ylang ylang in terms of fragrance quality so keep that in mind when purchasing this precious oil.

Emotionally this oil has sedative, antidepressant and aphrodisiac properties.  It has been stated that ylang ylang has a profound ability to address anxiety about sexual inadequacy.  Traditionally in Indonesia, the flowers of this tree are spread across the marriage bed of newlyweds.  As stated by Gabriel Mojay, "The aphrodisiac power of ylang ylang is inseparable both from its ability to relax and uplift, and from its voluptuous aroma."

So as previously stated ylang ylang is known for its exotic spicy sweetness and it is a great addition to perfumery.  Please keep in mind that using a high concentration of this essential oil may in fact cause nausea and/or headaches.  This is a very profound oil so sometimes using less is more than enough.

Cosmetically Ylang Ylang is used for both dry and oily skin due to the balancing action on the secretion of sebum.  So you can see how this oil obtains balance for the skin.  It is great when added to a facial serum because it is a multipurpose essential oil when trying to address various skin types.   It has also been stated that ylang ylang has been used to address hair loss and is considered a hair tonic.  

Ylang Ylang is amazing in its ability to slow down an over rapid heartbeat and breathing.  May be excellent for short term use to address conditions of shock, anxiousness or anger.  This oil also demonstrates the ability to lower blood pressure. You must use caution using with individuals that suffer from low blood pressure.

Resources

Davis P. Aromatherapy an A-Z. New revised edition C.W. Daniel Company Limited, England, 1999

Cooksley, V. Aromatherapy: Soothing Rmedies to Restore, Rejuvenate, Prentice Hall Press, 2002

Mojay, G. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, The Healing Arts Press edition, Limited 1999

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease.

*Image courtesy of Susan Ford Collins/Jungle Mama (www.flickr.com/photos/jungle_mama/)

Coriander Essential Oil

Latin Name: Coriandrum sativum

 

Family: Umbelliferae (Apiaceae)

 

Extraction Method:  Steam Distilled

 

Aroma:  Fresh, Lemony and scentual

Coriander is an herb which grows 11 to 13 inches in height.  It is native to Russia and Romania, North Africa and some plants are found growing wild in parts of England.  The dried seed (not the essential oil) is used as a flavoring agent in many Indian dishes and the leaf which is known as cilantro is a staple for many Mexican dishes.  All parts of the corainder herb is utilized for cooking.  

On an emotional level, corainder essential oil is known to possess relaxing qualities due to its normally high linalool content.  Linalool is responsible for possessing antianxiety and sedative properties.  Coriander has been referred to as being motivating and uplifting.  The aroma aids in relieving stress.  This oil is wonderful when blending with other calming essential oils such as lavender.  The aroma may not be as pleasant when blending on its own.   Known as an Herb of protection and of Immortality, corainder can imbue a feeling of security, peace and earthy permanence. 

Because of its linalool component, coraiander has been used to support rheumatic pain, headaches, inflammation, intestinal gas and cystitis flu.  This is because therapeutically linalool is known to be antioxidant, analgesic,anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, antispasmodic and immunostimulant.  Corainder is gently warming which makes it so beneficial for conditions of pain.  The Coriander seed has also been used in treatment of anorexia nervosa because of its stimulating action on the appetite. 

Resources

Davis P. Aromatherapy an A-Z. New revised edition C.W. Daniel Company Limited, England, 1999

Keville, K and Green, M. Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide To The Healing Art, Crossing Press, Second Edition, 2009

Mojay, G. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, The Healing Arts Press edition, Limited 1999

Schnaubelt, K. Medical Aromatherapy, Healing With Essential Oils. Frog LTD 1999

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease.

*Image courtesy

Essential Oil Blending Workshop For Stress and Anxiety Giveaway

We here at Aromatherapy Oasis are happy to announce another wonderful giveaway. This is a one time giveaway to celebrate our first workshop. This is a once on a lifetime event and we look forward to you participating and helping to spread the word. I am looking forward to seeing you in our class!!!

 

The class is for July 20, 2013 and you can check out this link for more details.

Location: 28th W. 29th Street, NEw York, NY 10018 (4th Floor)

             

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Lemongrass Essential Oil

Latin Name: Cymbopogon citratus

 

Family: Poaceae

 

Extraction Method:  Grass is steam distilled

 

Aroma:  Lemony, Fresh, Piney, Bittersweet and woody

Lemongrass is a scented grass that is native to India but is also cultivated in Brazil, Sri Lanka and parts of Central Africa.  Upon harvest the grass is finely chopped to prepare it for extraction through steam distillation.  The main constituents of lemongrass is geranial and neral.  These two constituents offers a host of therapeutic properties which includes being analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-fungal, antispasmodic, antitumoral, antiviral and sedative.

Lemongrass has been used cosmetically to counter oily hair, skin infections, acne, scabies and ringworm when diluted in a carrier.  Emotionally the fragrance is sedating and soothing, and it is helpful when dealing with stress and nervous exhaustion.  It has been stated that growth and change can occur when this essential oil is blended with myrrh.

This essential oil does come with some safety considerations.  Lemongrass must be diluted and can be highly  irritating if applied directly to the skin.

 

Resources

Davis P. Aromatherapy an A-Z. New revised edition C.W. Daniel Company Limited, England, 1999

Keville, K and Green, M. Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide To The Healing Art, Crossing Press, Second Edition, 2009

 Edwards, V.H, The Aromatherapy Companion, Storey Publishing, 1999

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease.

*Image courtesy of Jade Shutes/EWSAS (www.theida.com)

Faith And Hope (Flower essence blends)

Recently I had the opportunity while taking my aromatherapy certification course to be introduced to flower essences.  Flower essences are an infusion of flowers in water and therefore stabilized by a mixture of brandy and water.  The water now has the energetic essence of the plant.  They are the energetic imprints of the life force of plants and is a natural and safe method of energetic healing.  Flowers essences does not possess scent and should not be confused with essential oils or herbal tinctures. 

From a traditional science point of view, flower essence’s would be dismissed as just pure nonsense.  I have read somewhere that the reason some feel it works for people is because of the placebo effect.  A reason that most physicians have a hard time accepting alternative healing methods is because they see the physical body as the only dimension of human existence. I recently came across an article that emphasized vibrational medicine and decided to study a little further. 

As stated in the book Vibrational Medicine; flower essences offers one a unique vibrational tool which can help mobilize the unseen subtle energetic factors of health and illness in the direction of greater balance and homeostasis.  They must work in conjunction with natural cellular and subtle energetic systems to allow the body, mind and spirit to reachieve proper orientation and balance along the most natural routes.

It is suggested that flower essences may have originated with the Atlantean culture.  Various flower essences and other similar remedies were developed to treat illness that arose for the first time in Atlantis. One of the most popular and well respected names associated with flower essence healing is Dr. Edward Bach.  Dr. Bach insight to illness was the emotional contribution to it.  He searched for a way to bring people to a level of harmonious balance.  Through observation Dr. Bach discovered the effects of the various flowers and how they affected him.  Dr. Bach took long walks though the English countryside in search of the healers within nature.  He would touch the morning dew from a flower or petal and put it to his lips and experience the potential therapeutic effects of the plant.

Dr. Bach developed these flower essence remedies and some were used to treat the emotional reactions to disease as well as the temperaments leading up to the eventual cellular pathology in the body.  There are many more flower-essence practitioners available since the time of Dr. Bach.  Most practitioners that make there own essences will gather information regarding the energetics of the flower by partaking (tasting) the essence. 

Flower essences are used orally under the tongue, applied to the body or made into a spray.   By dropping the essence under the tongue you are releasing the energy of the flower which is vibrating at its own special frequency therefore flooding one’s aura.  The flower’s healing essence will harmonize the body’s vibrations to its own special healing needs. It is not recommended to use flower essences with those that have alcohol substance abuse issues.  The essence can still be used but not directly administered under the tongue.  

Flower essences can be of benefit to those that are experiencing loss of hope and for those in hospice situations.  I recently made a spray blend utilizing this method.  A spray was developed using several flower essences.  The essences were obtained from several flower essence practitioners.  This flower essence spray was added to a carrier of organic lavender hydrosol and the addition of essential oils was used.  The spray proved to be helpful in providing comfort and emotional support but not a cure.  It also benefited sleep.  I will never be sure if it was only the organic lavender hydrosol that provided relief or the whole combination of essential oils blended with the flower essence.  The importance of the method for the blend for hospice and other similar blends is that it provides a host of emotional support by restoring balance.

Resources

Gerber, R. M.D.  Vibrational Medicine: The #1 Handbook Of Subtle-Energy Therapies. Third Edition Bear & Company, Rochester, Vermont, 2001

*This post is for informational purposes only.  This is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure any ailments or disease.

Cypress Essential Oil

Latin Name: Cupressus sempervirens

 

Family: Cupressaceae

 

Extraction Method: Steam distilled using the cones, leaves and twigs.

 

Aroma:  Balsamic, Fresh, Sweet woodsy, piney and slightly citrus

Cypress is a confir that can grow to a height of 82 to 147 feet.  Despite its size it bears small flowers that produces round  grayish brown cones.  The  green leaves and twigs contain most of this delightful essential oil.  Cypress is native to Southern Europe but has spread to Africa and North America.  Cypress is now cultivated in France, Morocco and Spain.

It has been said that both the Egyptians and Romans dedicated this tree to their gods of death and the underworld.  This may be why the Cypress tree is associated with cemeteries.    The name sempervirens means 'ever-living' which pertains  to the evergreen nature of the leaves, but the perpetual greenness of the trees may also have been used as a symbol of life after death.   The usage of cypress as medicine and an incense was originally recorded in the papyri of Ancient Egypt, where the wood was used to make coffins.

Cypress essential oil carries one of the most profound psychological actions.  The astringent, woody notes of the essence conveys a feeling of cohesion and stability; while its fresh, coniferous pungency helps both psychological transition and real life change.  Cypress can help one to flow with the flux of life; encouraging the process of taking in and letting go.  From here we can contemplate the tree's long and deep relationship to death and the grieving process; maybe explaining why it is thought to be of comfort to those in bereavement.   Cypress has been used to aid those in the process of dying and for those dealing with grief.  Cypress has also been used ease insomnia, nervousness and may increase stamina by helping people move on with their lives after an emotional crisis.

Cypress also has a host of medicinal properties.  It is very astringent, and is used wherever there is an excess of fluid.  According to Kurt Schnaubelt author of Medical Aromatherapy: Healing With Essential Oils; Cypress is a decongestant for prostate, veins and the lymphatic system and its bitter principles strengthen a weak pancreas.  It is also said to prevent the spread of varicose veins, hemorrhoids and edema.  Cypress also has antispasmodic properties, acting especially on the bronchi.  Noted by Patricia Davis author of Aromatherapy A-Z; a drop or two inhaled from a hankie or tissue will help to relieve an asthma attack and the spasmodic coughing of whooping cough.

I have made several blends utilizing cypress essential oils to address emotional concerns and after researching the history of the energetics; it gives one a deeper understanding of why this is such a great oil to address major life transitions.

 

Resources

Davis P. Aromatherapy an A-Z. New revised edition C.W. Daniel Company Limited, England, 1999

Keville, K and Green, M. Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide To The Healing Art, Crossing Press, Second Edition, 2009

Mojay, G. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, The Healing Arts Press edition, Limited 1999

Schnaubelt, K. Medical Aromatherapy. Healing with Essential Oils. Frog, Ltd 1999

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease.

*Image courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/28188015@N05/

 

Neroli Essential Oil

Latin Name: Citrus aurantium var. amara

 

Family: Rutaceae

 

Extraction Method: Distilled from the blossoms of the bitter orange tree, not the sweet orange that produces orange oil.

 

Aroma:  Sweet, floral, spicy, and citrus.

 

It is said that Neroli was named after the sixteenth-century Italian princess of Nerola who admired the scent.  She used it as one of her favorite perfumes.  This essential oil has a very exotic and sensual aroma and it would be a perfumers delight.  The scent is very strong, so it is advised to use in very small dilutions.  Neroli is one of three different oils that are obtained from the same (Citrus aurantium) tree.  Neroli is derived from the flowers; Bitter orange is derived from the peel and Petitgrain is distilled from the fragrant leaves.  The major producers of Neroli essential oil are Italy, France and Tunisa.

General Description: It is common for Neroli to have active principles of linalol, linalyl acetate, limonene, nerol, geraniol and nerolidol.  To be sure of what your Neroli essential oil consist of please refer to the GC/MS that your supplier should have available.  Neroli has a vast amount of properties from the medicinal to emotional.  It is described as both sensual and spiritual in that it helps to reestablish the links between a disconnected body and mind.  As stated by Garbiel Mojay; neroli may be considered for any deep emotional pain that robs us of our hope and joy.

Medicinal Characteristics: Neroli has been used for circulation disorders such as hemorrhoids, indigestion and high blood pressure.  One of the physical actions of this oil is to relieve spasms in the smooth muscle, especially that of the intestines.  It has also been used to treat muscle pain.  Neroli is also beneficial for cosmetic uses.  It may regenerate skin cells for dermatitis; good for mature, sensitive, acne prone skin.  It may also repair scars and varicose veins.

Emotional Properties:  Neroli essential oil is a heavy weight when dealing with emotional concerns.  It is very valuable for dealing with anxiety and can be used effectively to reduce anxiety before stressful events such as interviews, examinations or public speaking events.  For those that are emotionally intense or an individual who can be easily alarmed and agitated this would be an ideal oil to utilize.  As stated in Aromatherapy: A complete guide to the healing art; neroli is one of the best antidepressants and it may counter emotional shock, mental confusion, nervous strain, fear and lack of confidence.  Along with lavender, melissa and rose; it is one of the best oils to calm and stabilize the heart and mind.  On a ending note this oil may have hormonal properties and has been used in ancient times as an aphrodisiac.

Safety Considerations:  No safety concerns specific to this essential oil.

Resources

 Davis P. Aromatherapy an A-Z. New revised edition C.W. Daniel Company Limited, England, 1999

Keville, K and Green, M. Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide To The Healing Art, Crossing Press, Second Edition, 2009

Mojay, G. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, The Healing Arts Press edition, Limited 1999

 

*Please note:  This information is not to replace physician advice or to be used as treatment or diagnose of a disease. 

 

*Image courtesy of (http://orangeblossomfarmgreece.blogspot.com)

 

 

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